***VIDEO/PHOTO RELEASE*** Menendez: A Free, Open Internet isn’t a Luxury, it’s a Necessity

***VIDEO/PHOTO RELEASE*** Menendez: A Free, Open Internet isn’t a Luxury, it’s a Necessity

Menendez: Cory Booker and I, from New Jersey, know a thing or two about traffic jams. With the FCC’s decision to scrap net neutrality, they’re essentially telling the American people, “it’s time for some traffic problems on the internet.”

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, on Net Neutrality National Day of Action, U.S. Senator Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) joined fellow Democrats at a rally for net neutrality and encouraged his Republican colleagues to be the one crucial vote to save the internet. The senator emphasized the importance of net neutrality to small businesses and start-ups, and warned of an internet where consumers would have to pay more for online activity.

Also today, Democrats introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution in both the Senate and House to undo the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December 2017 action to dismantle net neutrality rules. In the Senate, the CRA is cosponsored by  50 senators—every Democrat, plus Susan Collins (R-Maine), just one shy of the votes necessary to pass the Senate.  

 

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“Cory Booker and I, from New Jersey, know a thing or two about traffic jams.  With the FCC’s decision to scrap net neutrality– they’re essentially telling the American people – ‘it’s time for some traffic problems on the internet,’” said Sen. Menendez.  “Make no mistake, without net neutrality, consumers will have to pay more to get online, shop online, study online, watch movies online and stay connected with friends and family.  A free and open internet isn’t a luxury.  In the 21st century, it’s a necessity.  For families, for innovators, for businesses of all sizes, for our economy and for our future. All we need is one more vote to save the internet.” 

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Net neutrality, in simplest terms, ensures that all data on the internet—regardless of the source or destination—is treated equally by internet service providers (ISPs).  Last month, the FCC voted 3-2 to rescind 2015 Obama-era rules that included a “no blocking” provision banning broadband providers from blocking any lawful content or services, and a “no throttling” provision barring broadband providers from slowing legal internet traffic based on its content.