Menendez Opposes Trump IRS Commissioner Nominee Charles Rettig

Menendez Opposes Trump IRS Commissioner Nominee Charles Rettig

   

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Bob Menendez (D.N.J), a senior member of the Senate Finance Committee that sets national tax policy, voted against  President Trump’s nominee for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner, Charles Rettig. Mr. Rettig appears poised to double down on the Trump Administration’s repeated efforts to increase the property tax burden on middle-class New Jerseyans and refused to pledge he would follow years of precedent and allow New Jersey to implement its tax credit program.  Senator Menendez has criticized the IRS’s recent guidance that appears to target only blue-states, like New Jersey, that have developed charitable state-tax credit programs, while ignoring 32 other states, many of which are conservative, that have operated similar or nearly identical programs for years. 

“The people of New Jersey already pay too much in property taxes and the last thing they need is to be taxed twice on the same dollar,” said Sen. Menendez.  “Trump’s nominee for IRS Commissioner has failed assure me that he will not weaponized the IRS against states like New Jersey and I cannot support his nomination.”

Last month, Sen. Menendez grilled Mr. Rettig, about the Trump Administration’s repeated efforts to increase the property tax burden on middle-class New Jerseyans and warned him about using the IRS as a political weapon.   

The Trump Tax Bill, which passed the Senate on a Republican-only vote, will hurt many New Jersey taxpayers who pay more than $10,000 in state and local property taxes.  Estimates indicate that more than 1-in-10 New Jersey households will see an increase in their federal income taxes.

Sen. Menendez is the author of legislation in the U.S. Senate to fully restore the State and Local Tax Deduction (SALT). He also led the New Jersey Congressional delegation’s response to the announcement by the IRS that it intends to issue new rules to effectively block New Jersey’s efforts to protect its taxpayers from the Trump Tax Law’s $10,000 cap on SALT deductions, resulting in the double-taxing of up to 1.8 million, or 40 percent of New Jersey taxpayers.

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