Menendez, Booker Announce $2.2 Million in Federal Funding to Help Prevent Alcohol, Opioid Abuse Among NJ Youth and Young Adults

Menendez, Booker Announce $2.2 Million in Federal Funding to Help Prevent Alcohol, Opioid Abuse Among NJ Youth and Young Adults

 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  – Today, U.S. Senators Bob Menendez and Cory Booker announced the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has awarded New Jersey’s Department of Health $2,260,000 to expand substance abuse prevention programs aimed at reducing underage drinking, opioid use among young adults between 18-25 years old, and the use of new emerging drugs, among other priorities.

“Tackling the growing opioid addiction crisis in New Jersey requires a multi-faceted, comprehensive approach, and that means utilizing the full range of resources available at the state, local and federal level,” said Sen. Menendez. “No family or community can do this alone.  This federal funding is another piece of our strategy to reach young people in every community, to fight this terrible epidemic -- and win.”

“Addressing substance abuse and New Jersey’s growing opioid crisis requires us to ensure there are adequate preventive resources in our communities,” said Sen. Booker.  “This federal investment takes an important step in combatting substance abuse by strengthening strategic partnerships among care providers and getting our most vulnerable young adults the care they need.”

The SPF-PFS program is designed to ensure that prevention strategies and messages reach the populations most impacted by substance abuse. The program extends partnerships by connecting substance abuse prevention programming to departments of social services and their community service providers, working with populations disproportionately impacted by the consequences of substance abuse like children entering the foster care system, transitional youth, and individuals that support persons with substance abuse issues.

Sen. Menendez continues to fight for increased federal funding to help combat the opioid and illicit drug abuse epidemic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2,620 people died of drug overdoses in New Jersey in 2017 and that number is only expected to duplicate as NJ AG’s office estimates 2,032 New Jerseyans have died of the same cause so far this year.

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