Author Of 'Clear Airfares Act' Says Report Of Hidden Summer Airfare Increase Is More Reason To Support Bill

Author Of 'Clear Airfares Act' Says Report Of Hidden Summer Airfare Increase Is More Reason To Support Bill

Legislation is included in Senate’s FAA bill

Washington - A report by FareCompare.com and The USA Today released today shows that airfares for nearly every day this summer have been quietly made subject to a $10-$30 "peak travel day" surcharge (http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2010-05-24-1Aairsurcharge24_ST_N.htm). U.S. Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ), author of the Clear Airfares Act, says that this report shows how a full and upfront breakdown of airfares is more necessary than ever. A slightly modified version of Menendez's bill to provide such breakdowns to consumers was included in the Senate Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization legislation, which is in the process of being merged with the House-passed bill.

"At a time when families are watching every penny, airlines are using a phony label to tack on as much as $30 to most tickets this summer," said Menendez. "Whether it's a surcharge or baggage fee, families should at the very least be given a clear listing of everything they are expected to pay before they book their tickets. That's what the Clear Airfares legislation would do, and that's why I am pushing to ensure that it remains in the final version of the Federal Aviation Administration bill."

Menendez's Clear Airfares provision aims to bring transparency to the price of flying through a full, clear and upfront breakdown of airfares. Before a consumer purchases a ticket on the Internet, the legislation would require airlines and third-party websites to give consumers a complete and understandable breakdown of his or her particular airfare, as well as any other possible fees that might be incurred on the flight (such as baggage, seat assignments, etc.). The Senate and House of Representatives now must negotiate and pass a final version of the FAA bill before it goes to President Barack Obama to be signed into law.

Currently, consumers must click to peripheral web pages and wade through often confusing text to understand whether or not their airfare includes surcharges and what other taxes and fees may have been added.

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